Archive for the ‘Quilts Delivered’ Category

Bennett Freeze 2016

February 9, 2016

We had a wonderful result with our Bennett Freeze Forgotten People initiative last year.  Once so many of you sent your quilts, the work began in Arizona.  Many volunteers helped sort and distribute quilts to quite a few happy recipients. They gave away quilts all during the month of December to several different groups. Women’s shelters, senior citizen centers, and families with young children were all visited and given the warmth and love of one of your quilts.Our contact person sent me an email the beginning of January saying that there were a few people who walked away empty handed from the last giveaway they had 😦 and she asked if I had a couple dozen more to send. Since the generosity of all of you is so amazing, I was able to do that quickly so we sent well over 200 quilts this year! One thing she mentioned was that these quilts truly let these folks know that they are not forgotten and that they are loved. She tried to capture that in these pictures and it’s fun to see the different expressions.

grandma 2 chargers quilt checkerboard recipient grandpa with chevrons sunshine lotto block

 

 

 

 

 

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happy smiles town quilt sunshine lotto block string patchwork quilt sane:sart 4

 

 

 

 

 

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Thank you all so much for all you do! I hope these brightened your day as much as YOU brightened THEIRS!

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Quilts from St. James the Less, NILAG, Jolene, Marci and Jeanne AND Deliveries to Gaza and Jordan

May 23, 2015

April was a great month for Quilts Beyond Borders.  We received lots of beautiful tops and quilts from a lot of wonderful quilters and piecers.  The ones I’d like to feature in this post are the ones I received here in Illinois from the quilters of St. James the Less in Northfield, IL and the Northern Illinois Long Arm Guild (NILAG), as well as some quilts I received in April from Jolene McClellan and earlier in the year from Jeanne Ayers and Marci Lane.

St. James the Less    First, here are the beautiful tops I received from my friend, Sue Babbs, of St. James the Less.  Sue’s group has been contributing to Quilts Beyond Borders for many years, and the quilt tops they provide are always beautiful, well made, and kitted up with backing and binding to make it easy for us to quickly pass them along to longarmers to finish up and speed them along the way to needy children and orphans.  Here is a picture of Sue the day she delivered the tops to me, and pictures of all the tops I received that day.  These cute tops were made by Jill, Betsy, Linda, Diane, Meredith, Sarah and Sue.   For a closer look at any picture, click on the thumbnail.  To see who made it, hover over it with your cursor and the name will appear in the lower left corner of the screen.

Sue Babbs 2015 03 02 Betsy(2) 2015 03 14 Diane (2) 2015 03 14 Jill (1) 2015 03 14 Jill (2) 2015 03 14 Jill (3) 2015 03 14 Jill (4) 2015 03 14 Jill (5) 2015 03 15 Betsy 2015 03 15 Linda 2015 03 15 Meredith 2015 03 15 Sarah 2015 03 16 Linda 2015 03 20 Linda 2015 03 31 Sue

Northern Illinois Longarm Group    The following pictures are quilts I received from NILAG.   This is the longarm guild to which I belong — a great group of quilters who meet every other month.  For info about this guild, here’s the URL to their blog:  http://illinoislongarmguild.blogspot.com/

These wonderful quilts were quilted by:

  • Sharon Gaber (top by Meredith, of St. James the Less)
  • Sandra Smith (tops by Sandra Smith and Carmen Zapata)
  • Anonymous NILAG  (3 quilts, including one from a top by Jill of St. James the Less)

As above, click on the photo for a closer look, and hover over to see the names of the quilter and piecer.

Nilag 1 Nilag 2 Nilag 3 Sandra Smith 1 Sandra Smith 2 Sharon & Meredith

Jolene McClellan    Jolene is a longarmer in Wisconsin.  She sent these four beautiful quilts which were made from tops by Teri Goade, Bobbi and Jackie Nickols, Judy Wood and Tracey Murphy.

Jolene McClellan & Teri GoadeJolene McClellan & Bobbi & Jackie Nichols Jolene McClellan & JudyWood  Jolene McClellan & Tracey Murphy

Marci Lane  Marci, a quilter from Texas, pieced and quilted the two cute quilts shown below and dropped them off to us at the International Quilt Festival in Houston last year.  There was a third one as well, but I’m afraid I sent it on to be delivered to a needy child before I had a chance to photograph it!  Hopefully we’ll see a picture of it wrapped around a child when it’s delivered.

Marci Lane 1 Marci Lane 2

Jeanne Ayers   Jeanne Ayers, of Florida, has been quilting for Quilts Beyond Borders for many years now, and always makes adorable quilts for us.  These two are no exception!

Jeanne Ayers 1 Jeanne Ayers 2

Thanks to all the wonderful quilters who made all of these beautiful quilts!  I know the children who receive them will cherish them!  Many of them have already been boxed up and sent to the State of Washington where they were delivered to the Salaam Cultural Museum which is taking them as part of a humanitarian mission to Jordan for refugees from the Syrian war and to Gaza for children in a Cerebral Palsy hospital.  For more information about this mission and for some pictures, keep reading!

Deliveries to Jordan and Gaza

I received a note from one of our Board members, Karen Vander Stoep, summarizing a meeting she had with Rita Zawaidah, the Director of the Salaam Cultural Museum who is leading the effort to get humanitarian aid to Syrian refugees in Jordan.  Here is that note:

Quilts for children in trauma centers, Jordan and Syria
We are in full swing on this initiative with a target of 480 quilts by November.  Such a hefty undertaking, but nevertheless we are moving along.

I had the pleasure of meeting with Rita Zawaideh today.  She’s the one woman icon who is leading the effort to establish trauma centers for refugee children.  One is operating right now in Aman, serving 40 children per day; 3 evenings per week – adult women are treated for trauma and 2 times per month, families are treated.  The full time staff includes 4 social workers, a psychiatrist and a psychologist.

We call it the trauma center, but its name is the Malki Center, named after the wife of a volunteer Dr. She gave $60,000 to erect the building. The Malki Center will be expanded with another site in Jordan; funds have been donated to build that building.

Our quilts are also to be received by what I call “the lost children of Syria Idlib.” 35 children, ages 6-15, living in a cave in Syria. They have no family, no papers so they cannot get out. Rita’s group provides clothing, food, needed aid and walks to the outside when it is safe. I can assure you she is always looking for a way to get them out.

It is such a privilege to know Rita and the endless contributions she makes to the refugee effort. I mentioned that I have often told people, she walks really close to God. She started crying and I wasn’t sure I would get her back. She said, “Sometimes I am quite emotional about what I do.” Well, no wonder.

So to you all, your investment in quilts for refugee children is so much appreciated. I had mentioned they would go on the next container. She says oh no, they go in our baggage, they’re special quilts.

Thanks again for all you do!
Karen

Below are pictures of quilts delivered to children in the Trauma Center in Jordan:

TC - Jordan 5

TC - Jordan 1 TC - Jordan 2 TC - Jordan 3

TC - Jordan 4  TC - Jordan 6

You can see that it’s always important for the children to have their names written on the labels that are on the backs of the quilts.   So many of the children who receive our quilts have left their homes with only the clothes on their backs and what they can carry in their hands, so they really treasure receiving a quilt of their very own.

The following pictures were taken in a Cerebral Palsy school in Gaza.  Salaam Cultural Museum worked with the Physicians for Social Responsibility to get the quilts delivered to the children there.

Gaza 2

Gaza 1 Gaza 4 Gaza 3

We have delivered more than 180 quilts to Salaam Cultural Museum since March, and anticipate delivering another 300 before November.  Great thanks to the quilters who created the quilts in the pictures above, and all the quilters and volunteers who have helped us and continue to help us with these efforts!

Best regards,

Carla

 

Pictures from Ukraine, and Letter Describing Delivery

December 7, 2014

We recently received a note from Charity Jacobson who took 89 quilts to the Romaniv Orphanage for disabled boys in Ukraine.   She also sent us some pictures.   We sometimes find that the people who run the orphanages don’t always let us personally distribute the quilts to the children, and when that happens, we’re always happy when we get pictures later, which was the case here.

Great thanks to all of the wonderful quilters who made this delivery possible!

Here are the pictures Charity received:

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Charity’s note:

Early this year, toward the end of August, I was able to make a trip to Ukraine. While there, I had the opportunity to visit Romanov orphanage. This orphanage is home to 84 boys all of whom are physically and/or mentally challenged. The boys range in ages from 5 to 30. In Ukraine, typically people who are raised in an orphanage do not ever escape the orphanage system, but they spend their entire lives there. As a whole, orphanages are sad places with little care actually being given to the children. Oftentimes, the children (especially those with special needs) are looked down upon as sub-human and unimportant. People who get jobs working at orphanages will often steal from the orphans. The boys’ orphanage in Romanov is a special place. The director of this orphanage has worked hard to make it different from the “normal” orphanage in Ukraine. He has planted lots of flowers all over the grounds, he has painted walls, and he allows people to come in and interact with the boys. He has worked hard to keep the orphanage from becoming corrupt. All of the gifts given to the boys are recorded and kept track of. Thus, it is difficult for anyone who works there to steal.

Almaz (or diamond) Church in Kyiv, Ukraine has taken this boys orphanage as one of its ministries. They have been diligent in raising funds for the orphanage to help feed the boys real meat, to help get them some dental care, and to bring some joy to their lives. The Mercy Ministries team at Almaz tries to visit these boys as often as they can. They visit them at least 4 times a year and seek to visit them more often. The boys know these people and they look forward to hearing Bible teaching and taking part in some games/activities with the visitors from Almaz.

When I went to this orphanage in Romanov, I partnered with Almaz Church in order to get there. We went as a team of five people. Before leaving the States in August, I had sent the quilts on ahead because there was too many to keep track of on a flight. With the help of some very generous people here in the U.S., I was able to pay for everything including shipping and the cost of a day trip.

Early Friday morning, I woke up and was driven, with my translator, to the metro station (about 30 minutes away). We then rode the metro for about 45 minutes across and under Kyiv. I was jostled around as I tried to keep myself from falling over amid the swaying of the metro. It was a good time to study the people of Ukraine as I silently stood watching the masses going to work. Finally, we reached the western side of Kyiv and walked to a McDonalds to await the rest of the team. Sasha and Ina, a newly married couple who work regularly with special needs people and have a great desire to serve these boys, met us first. Not long after, Vladimir – our driver – arrived with the van full of shoe boxes from Samaritan’s Purse to also gift to the boys. Our car was full as we sped along the roads of Ukraine to the village. It felt like we must be Saint Nicolas with our van packed with quilts and other small gifts. However, instead of the smooth ride in the sleigh, we jostled and rumbled along the pothole-covered dirt roads trying to keep the boxes from falling on our heads as we went.

Finally, about three hours later, we arrived at the orphanage. I’d been there before and was thankful that I knew what to expect. We tumbled out of the car and stretched our legs a bit before gathering in a circle to make our plans. I strained to understand the Ukrainian/Russian chatter of the other four. Finally, we were ready. The assistant director met us and brought us to the warehouse where we could unload our gifts. He explained that he would need an exact count of everything we were bringing for their records. We popped the boxes of quilts open and did a final count of how many were there. I was surprised and pleased to find that there were a few extra. I can’t swear by it, but I believe the final count was 89! Every one of the quilts had made it safely through! At this point, the assistant director informed us that he was going to put the quilts in storage for another time. I worked hard to explain to him (through my translator) that we had come to give the quilts to the boys ourselves. It had been pre-confirmed by the director that we could do this. However, despite arguing for twenty minutes with him upon this point, I got nowhere. The deal was, we were not to give the boys the quilts because there were government official at the orphanage that day who were doing an inspection. Something about handing the quilts out was contrary to the normal ritual and thus could put a black mark on their report. Alas, I had to submit to this sad state of affairs and just go along with it. I would still see the boys and leave the gifts to be distributed another time. After our long argument, the assistant director finally took some pity on the frustrated American and said that we would act out giving the quilts away for pictures and then he would put the quilts away. I was not very interested in this as I didn’t want the boys to have false hope. I was assured by the rest of my team that this orphanage was honest and that, as the weather got colder, the boys would get their quilts. I could do nothing but trust. The next few hours we spent talking with the boys, listening to Sasha preach a little sermon, and playing a few games. They were so happy to have us all there. We shook many hands, gave many hugs, and were happily received by the boys. They were very thankful for our visit and asked that we return very soon.

I went away that day sad at what I saw and disappointed that we could not have been able to give them our gifts personally. We so wanted them to know that we cared for them and loved them. After getting back to Kyiv and talking over the trip with the pastor and the other team members, we settled on a plan that another group of people would go back to Romanov in a couple of months and get an update on the quilts. They would make sure that they were being use and that the boys were allowed to have them.

Just this morning, as I was sitting down to write to the pastor at Almaz Church and inquire on the status of this latest trip, I received and email from him. He informed me that he had just recently received some un-staged pictures of the orphanage and that the quilts were obviously being used! Not every boy got a quilt because some of them are so destructive that they would ruin it quickly, but those who can appreciate it and take care of it without immediately destroying them are being allowed to have the quilts on their beds.

Not every person will have the opportunity to see their quilt in the arms of a happy boy and I am very sorry for that. Thankfully, however, the diligent work of Almaz Church and the cooperation of the orphanage director has assured that every quilt that was given to this orphanage will be used and loved by one of the orphan boys who live there. Each quilt will find its way into the arms of a needy boy who can enjoy, not only the colors and warmth, but the love that was poured into his quilt.

Again, thanks to all the wonderful quilters who made this delivery possible!  I would also like to thank those of you who have responded to our request for quilts for Syrian Refugees and for the Forgotten People of the Bennett Freeze Area.  We have reached our target for the Forgotten People, and the effort to get quilts for Syrian Refugee children will be on-going for some time.

Regards,

Carla

 

More Pictures from Uganda — and Quilts Headed to Uganda, Syrian Refugees and the IQF

October 23, 2014

Photos from Uganda:

My cousin, Cindy Roth, has sent me more pictures from the delivery she and her church members made  to New Hope, Uganda, earlier this year.   The photographer asked Cindy to let us know that the students have been delighted to get these beautiful quilts, and send along their thanks to all the quilters who made them!

Uganda - New Hope 8   uganda - new hope 5Uganda - New Hope 7 Uganda - new hope 6

Quilts Headed to Uganda, Syrian Refugees, and the IQF:

We have another initiative currently underway to get more quilts to more children in Uganda to the Christ the Center Ministries Primary and Nursery School in Kampala, Uganda.  We are also working with two organizations to get quilts to children who are refugees from the war in Syria.  And in all our spare time (LOL!) we’re finalizing plans for our fundraising booth at the International Quilt Festival in Houston.   Each year, with the permission of the makers, we sell some beautiful quilts at the IQF.  We have no paid staff, and the money we get from the sale of quilts (and the products we bring back from our quilt delivery trips) goes entirely to getting quilts finished and delivered to the children.  Some of the quilts below will be going to Uganda, others to Syrian refugees, and others will be going to Houston.

Loretta, our Regional Coordinator in Tyler, Texas, recently sent me some great photos of bright and cheerful quilts made by the team of Carolyn Sower, Sharon Turvaville,and Lana Davis.  Great job, Ladies!  These are wonderful!

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The following quilts were quilted by Jean Clarkson of the Mesquite Quilt Guild.  The quilts  pieced by Amy Bellany,  Mary Lou Stinson and MaryAnne Whitehead, are being sent to the school in Uganda.   The quilts pieced by Meral Fritchey and Judy Daniels are being shown at the Houston International Quilt Show as fundraiser quilts.   Whether in the US or abroad, some children are going to be very happy to cuddle under these lovely quilts!  Many thanks to the hands and hearts that provided these lovely quilts!

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Finally, I have a group of lovely and unusual quilts that were sent to me by several different quilters from different places.   Some of these quilts will be sent to Uganda, others to Syria, and others will be going to the IQF as fundraising quilts.  Great thanks to Jeanne Ayers, Cathy in Iowa of the Sunshine Guild, Marilyn Barba (quilted by Kin Hum), Susan Seward (pieced by Mary Jean Morrison), Sharon Mitchell, Linda La Fleur, Ann S, Lynda Galloway, Jean McKay and Judith White.  Thank you, Ladies!

Ann S Cathy in Iowa - Sunshine Guild Jean McKay Jeanne Ayers 1 Jeanne Ayers 2 Jeanne Ayers 3 Judith White Linda LaFleur Lynda Galloway Marilyn Barba - Kin Hum Mary Jane Morrison - Susan Seward Sharon Mitchell 1 Sharon Mitchell 2

We are so grateful to all the quilters who so generously gave of their stashes, time and talent to make all of these beautiful quilts!  Thank you all!

Regards,

Carla

Pictures from Uganda, and Quilts Headed for Guatemala

October 16, 2014

Photos from Uganda:

Earlier this year my cousin, Cindy Roth, and other members of her church group went to Uganda to New Hope to the Kasana Children’s Center to do some mission work there.  We sent 150 quilts along with them for the children.  Because of scheduling conflicts Cindy’s group wasn’t able to distribute the quilts personally, which is something that happens from time-to-time.  (It’s always a disappointment when that happens, because everyone wants to be Santa at least once in their lives!)  However Cindy just received some pictures from the delivery that occurred after the missionaries had left.

Here they are!

 

Uganda - New Hope 1 Uganda - New Hope 2 Uganda - New Hope 3 Uganda - New Hope 4

The smile on this boy”s face says it all, doesn’t it?  I know the children who received these and the other quilts we sent to Uganda will cherish them!  Great thanks to all the wonderful quilters who made all the beautiful quilts we sent to Uganda.

Quilts on their way to Guatemala:

Loretta Kelldorf, our Regional Coordinator in Tyler, Texas, has been coordinating an initiative for Orphan Outreach in Plano, Texas, to take some quilts to the Downs Syndrome School in Guatemala City, Guatemala.  She recently sent me these pictures of some of the beautiful quilts that will be on their way to the children in Guatemala shortly.  The quilters include Joanne Hopkins, Donna Della Camera (the winner of our Fat Quarter Challenge this year!), Margaret of Washington, Delleen of Oregon, Karen Vander Stoep, Karen Matheson, Donna Sciandra, Alice McQueen, MJF, Susan Brown, Jennifer DeMeuse and L. Hollingsworth.  To know which quilter made which quilt, please hover your cursor over the thumbnails.  For a close-up view, click on the thumbnail.

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Thank you, all the wonderful ladies who made these beautiful quilts!  We’ll post pictures of the children who receive them as soon as we get the pictures from Orphan Outreach.

Regards,

Carla

 

 

More Quilts Headed to Refugees in the Middle East

September 8, 2014

Over the last couple of weeks we’ve had some significant deliveries of quilts on the East and West coast of the US that will be headed to refugee children in the Middle East. Photos of quilts that Karen was gathering for the Salaam Cultural Museum in Seattle were shown in our last posting. Karen made another delivery to Rita of SCM yesterday, and had this to say:

Paul and I delivered another 63 quilts to the Salaam Cultural Museum today. Rita was glad to receive as she leaves on Monday for the middle east, along with a fleet of medical professionals, a full container of clothing and provisions. It just leaves us amazed at what one woman can generate. It’s been a real privilege meeting her.

Our quilts are especially welcome as winter approaches. Refugees are living in tents with no heat. Rita was much concerned about babies and appreciative of the quilts, which will help.

The scope of people displaced is huge, about 10-1/2 million Syrians (1/2 outside the country and 1/2 inside). Our quilts are also going to the displaced, in Gaza. In our way, we just quilt for one child at a time. We are blessed in giving and no doubt, the child is thrilled.

It was a day of “awe”. In all I’ve been able to deliver 113 quilts, they are all well done and beautiful. Thank you to everyone who has quilted to this occasion. Honestly, it was one amazing quilt show.

Currently QBB is sending quilts to refugees from a port in Virginia and also the port in Seattle. So, if you have quilts to send, please email quiltsbeyondborders@gmail.com, let us know the quantity and where you are sending from and we’ll provide an address, east or west, the closest to you.

Thank you for all you do, sewing and creating smiles!

Karen

Additionally, Noreen Fling and her husband Rodger have made a recent delivery of about 100 quilts to Gleaning for the World in Concord, VA for their upcoming deliveries to Jordan for Syrian refugees and Iraq for the Yazidi and Christian Refugees there.  Noreen sent pictures of the experience.

The first three pictures show her living room lost under 100 quilts!  Way in the corner between lamp and french door are 130 kitted quilt  tops, ready, so if you’re a longarmer with a little extra time and a generous heart, looking for something to practice on while developing new skills which will also improve the lives of children living in very difficult circumstances, drop us an email to quiltsbeyondborders@gmail.com and we’ll send you some tops  (kitted up with backing and binding) to work on.

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The pictures below show our delivery to Gleaning.  Noreen is the blond wearing the striped shirt and green capris.  Our contact at Gleaning, Daphne, is the blond wearing the black and white top and black slacks.  The other young women in the pictures are working at Gleaning, and you can see from the shots of the warehouse that they are working very hard to move lots of supplies and humanitarian aid that will make a great deal of difference to people living in crisis.

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Great thanks to all the quilters who have made it possible for us to deliver these 200+ beautiful quilts to SCM and Gleaning.  The children who receive them will love them, and as winter sets in they will greatly appreciate their warmth.

Regards,

Carla

Delivery to Children in Black Mesa, Navajo Nation

April 14, 2013

Quilts Beyond Borders has been working with Forgotten People, an organization dedicated to helping the Navajos living in the Bennett Freeze Area. The people who live there were legally prohibited from even putting electricity and running water in their homes until recently, and nights get cold there this time of year so the quilts we provided were very happily received by the children living there. We recently received photos of a delivery by Forgotten People to children at the Mesa View Baptist Church in Black Mesa.

Choices 1Choices 2???

Mabel Benallyand Fern BenallyLg groupBig group 2

Bigger group 3Bigger group 4

Close up kid w blanket 1Close up kid w blanket 2Close up kid w blanket 4Close up kid w blanket

The smiles on the faces of the children are wonderful to see!   Great thanks to all the quilters who helped to make this delivery possible!

Regards,

Carla

Quilt Delivery to Casa Vallado Orphanage in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

January 27, 2013

Nancy Sheppard is one of our new Regional Coordinators. She started 2013 in a wonderful way by going with some of her church members to San Luis Potosi, Mexico, about 260 miles north of Mexico City. This area of Mexico is about 6000 feet above sea level, and normally is 40-55 degrees Fahrenheit throughout the year, so the warmth of a quilt is certainly welcome at night.

Here is the wonderful picture that Nancy sent of her group with the children and their quilts:

Casa Vallado Orphanage – San Luis Potosi Mexico

Casa Vallado is an orphanage in San Luis Potosi, Mexico that cares for children who have either lost, or been abandoned by, their parents. The orphanage began in 2003 when a group of Christians sold their businesses and possessions to lovingly care for children who were living on the street. Casa Vallado functions 100% on charitable donations. The Vallado Project supports Casa Vallado through monthly sponsorships. The members of the Christ Community Church in Austin provide food, clothing, and educational needs to the Casa Vallado children, enabling the orphanage to better care for the children and to allow the volunteers to enjoy a better livelihood as well.

Nancy was particularly impressed by the women who took care of the children in the orphanage. “The volunteer moms are amazing and really touched my heart. The three young women give their lives to these children without receiving compensation of any kind.”

If you would like to learn more and would like to get involved go to:

http://www.cccaustin.com/mission/vallado-project/

Great thanks to Nancy and the members of Christ Community Church in Austin for making this delivery possible. You can see that the children are very happy with their new quilts!

Regards,
Carla